Friday, April 27, 2012

Nestle Purina, Walmart sued by pet owner over chicken jerky dog treats

    Nestle Purina Petcare Co. is being sued by a man from Chicago, Illinois, USA, who claims his dog died from eating the petfood manufacturer's Waggin’ Train dog treats. 
    According to a complaint filed in a Chicago federal court, Dennis Adkins says his 9-year-old Pomeranian became sick and died of kidney failure as a result of eating Waggin' Train's "Yam Good" chicken-wrapped treats. 
    “Waggin’ Train has spent millions of dollars in promoting trust and confidence among consumers in its pet food products,” Adkins says in the complaint. “The product was not wholesome, was not nutritious and was unhealthy.” 
    Adkins' complaint says that he purchased the treats on March 11 and fed one per day, in pieces, for three days, beginning March 13. He says he made no other changes to the dog's diet, but that the dog became ill on March 15 and died of kidney failure on March 26. Adkins also says in the complaint that his other 9-year-old Pomeranian did not consume the treats and did not become ill. 
    According to an emailed statement from Nestle Purina, the company feels the Waggin' Train treats are "safe to feed as directed."
    "We believe the claims made in the suit to be without merit and intend to vigorously defend ourselves,” Nestle says.
    Additionally, Adkins is suing Walmart, where he bought the treats, for compensatory and punitive damages, alleging the companies breached warranties that guaranteed the treats were suitable for consumption.  
    “At Walmart, we’re committed to providing our customers and their pets with safe and affordable food,” says Greg Rossiter, a Walmart spokesman. Rossiter says that all of the company’s petfood suppliers are required to comply with all applicable government safety regulations, and says the company is aware of the chicken jerky product concerns and is in contact with the Food and Drug Administration
    Adkins is also asking the court to recognize a class of plaintiffs made up of consumers who bought Nestle or Waggin’ Train- brand dog treats containing chicken imported from China within the past four years and a sub-class of those who made the purchases from Walmart.
    “Thousands of persons purchased the dog treats at issue, and hundreds of dogs died as a result,” says Adkins.

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